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WHAT´S NEW
Maritime Transport and the Climate Change Challenge
14 June 2012. New book -  edited by UNCTAD and co-published by the UN and Earthscan - offers information and analysis on the climate change challenge from the perspective of maritime transport and trade

International maritime transport is the backbone of the world globalized economy. It is a significant contributor to global CO2 emissions but also likely to be affected by wide-ranging and potentially devastating climate change impacts associated with rising sea levels and increased frequency/intensity of extreme weather events.

An UNCTAD edited volume on "Maritime Transport and the Climate Change challenge", has been co-published by the UN in May 2012 with Earthscan (Routledge/Taylor & Francis), one of the leading publishers in the field of environment and sustainability.

The book is the first of its kind, adopting a multidisciplinary approach and providing detailed insight on a range of the potential implications of climate change for this key sector of global trade. It includes contributions from experts from academia, international organizations - such as the IMO, the UNFCCC secretariat, OECD, IEA and the World Bank - as well as the shipping and port industries.

Issues covered:

  • The scientific background - greenhouse gas emissions from international shipping

  • Potential approaches to mitigation in maritime transport

  • The state of play in terms of the relevant regulatory and institutional framework

  • Potential climate change impacts and approaches to adaptation in maritime transport

  • Relevant cross-cutting issues such as financing and investment, technology and energy



Panel Discussion at UNCTAD XIII: Paving the Way to Sustainable Freight Transport
Doha, Qatar. 25 April 2012.

The strategic economic role of freight transport cannot be overemphasized. However, the strong nexus between freight transport activities, energy and environmental sustainability is yet to be adequately addressed.

Current freight transport systems are heavily reliant on oil for propulsion and are not yet in a position to effectively adopt cleaner energy alternatives and technologies. In view of the projected growth in freight transport, this entails some serious implications not only for transport costs and trade but also for the environment. The high dependency on oil and related greenhouse gas emissions place freight transport at the centre of the climate change debate. Unchecked, current unsustainable patterns of oil consumption and carbon emissions are likely to intensify and potentially result in global energy and environmental crises.

Climate change mitigation alone is not sufficient to achieve sustainability in freight transport. Adaptation is equally important to help minimize the impacts of climatic changes such as sea level rise and extreme weather event. Building the resilience of freight transport infrastructure and services, in particular ports and freight terminals is crucial for a globalised trade.

A transition to less oil-dependent and more energy-efficient and low carbon freight transport systems is, therefore, both an economic and environmental imperative and calls for active responses including mainstreaming the "sustainability" concept into freight transport planning and investment decisions. Mobilizing the requisite financial resources is equally important.

Purpose of the event

In view of the 2012 UN Conference on Sustainable Development (Rio+ 20) and the designation of the year 2012 as the International Year of Sustainable Energy, the event will provide an interactive platform for discussion and experience sharing on how best to enable a paradigm shift towards sustainable freight transport.

Bearing in mind the perspective of developing countries, the panel discussions will aim to, inter alia:

  • Explore the challenges and the opportunities associated with sustainable freight transport systems and identify related best practices.

  • Discuss the associated financial implications and the respective roles of the public and private sectors, including in the form of PPPs as well as of multilateral development banks and climate-based finance options.

  • Consider the potential role of international organizations, including UNCTAD in enabling the transition to sustainable freight transport.

Expected outcome / Deliverables

The event brings together government authorities, industry, financial institutions and academia with a view to:

  • Gain a better understanding of the meaning of sustainability" in freight transport and how to effectively mainstream the concept into transport planning and investment decisions.

  • Promote cooperation, information sharing, including on best practices in the field of sustainable freight transport.

  • Identify innovative financing mechanisms and the role of PPPs, climate finance and multilateral development banks in addressing the financial requirements.

  • Foster a dialogue between the public and the private sectors.

Organization

The event is jointly organized with the Asian Development Bank and will bring together governments, planning authorities, policy makers, the transport industry, financial institutions, academia and the civil society.


Contact:

José María Rubiato
+41 22 917 44 31
+41 22 917 00 50

E-mail: trade.logistics@unctad.org
Website: www.unctad.org/ttl


 

Quick Links: | UNCTAD XIII | More info |

Liability and Compensation for Ship-Source Oil Pollution: An Overview of the International Legal Framework for Oil Pollution Damage from Tankers
UNCTAD/DTL/TLB/2011/4
Around half of the global crude oil production is carried by sea. Much of this navigation is taking place in relative proximity to the coasts of many countries, in some cases transiting through constrained areas or chokepoints, such as narrow straits and/or canals. At the same time, the steady growth in the size and carrying capacity of ships transporting cargo of any type means that significant quantities of heavy bunker fuel are carried across the oceans and along coastal zones. With many coastal or small island developing states' economies heavily dependent on income from fisheries and tourism, exposure to damage arising from ship-source oil pollution incidents poses a potentially significant economic threat.

As concerns oil-pollution from tankers, a robust international legal framework is in place to provide significant compensation to those affected. However a number of coastal states, including developing countries that are potentially exposed to ship-source oil-pollution incidents, are not yet Contracting Parties to the latest legal instruments in the field. To assist policy makers in their understanding of the international legal framework and in assessing the merits of ratification, a new UNCTAD report has been published.


Regional Forum on Trade Facilitation Implementation Plans in Latin and Central America
ECLAC, Chile. 28-29 March 2012.
Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic. 12-13 April 2012.

Within the framework of the future WTO Trade Facilitation Agreement, it is expected that developing countries will need to notify to the WTO an implementation plan of the disciplines to be put into practice after the entry into force of the agreement. Measures that have not yet been implemented would be classified under either category B) requiring time to implement, or C) requesting time and technical assistance to implement. In order to do that, some countries may need technical assistance to identify their implementation capacity regarding the agreed trade facilitation measures.

Since the launch of the negotiations on trade facilitation in 2004, UNCTAD has provided extensive technical assistance and capacity building to developing members participating in the negotiations process. Indeed, through a Trade Facilitation Trust Fund UNCTAD has accompanied the national needs self-assessment, supported on the technicalities of trade facilitation, collaborated with the creation and strengthening of national trade facilitation working groups or committees, among others. It is anticipated that the next phase will include the development of implementation plans by developing country members.

OBJECTIVES
Through short presentations and group work, followed by an open discussion the forum aims at three objectives:

  1. Revise relevant elements from the future WTO Trade Facilitation Agreement, as well as the implementation advancement of trade facilitation measures in the Latin American region.

  2. Share the proposed methodology for the development of implementation plans in the framework of the Multi-donor UNCTAD Project with support of the EU, Norway and Spain, among others.

  3. Exchange and share national experiences and knowledge among the participants about the following issues:
    • context of the implementation of specific trade facilitation measures;
    • implementation planning;
    • management of the implementation process; and
    • monitoring and evaluation of the implementation.
    In this exercise the challenges, needs, best practices and lessons learned on trade facilitation implementation will be highlighted.

  4. Analyze how to align the implementation of trade facilitation measures included in the future WTO Trade Facilitation Agreement with the implementation of measures included in regional agreements.

PARTICIPANTS
Representatives of capitals familiarized with the implementation process of trade facilitation measures are invited to attend both forums.

DATES AND PLACE
28 and 29 of March 2012, ECLAC headquarters - Sala Celso Furtado, Santiago de Chile, Chile.
12 and 13 of April 2012, WCO Regional Training Center, Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic.

LANGUAGES
Spanish

ORGANIZED BY
The United Nations Conference on Trade and Development (UNCTAD), in collaboration with the UN Economic Commission for Latin America and the Caribbean (ECLAC) and the government of Dominican Republic, with the financial support of the Government of Spain in the framework of the UNCTAD Trust Fund “Capacity building in developing countries and least developing countries to support their effective participation in the WTO Negotiations Process on trade facilitation”.


Contact: Mr. Jan Hoffmann, UNCTAD Trade Facilitation Section
T.: (+41) 22 917 20 32
F.: (+41) 22 917 00 50
E.: jan.hoffmann@unctad.org

 

Quick Links: | CEPAL/ECLAC |

Multi-year expert meeting on transport and trade facilitation (fourth session) focusing on Challenges and policy options for transport and trade facilitation
Geneva, 7- 9 December 2011.

In accordance with the approved terms of reference (TD/B/55/9, paras. 1-5), the fourth and last session of the multi-year expert meeting will review topics discussed in the previous three sessions and will address the following topics:
 

  • Measures and actions to optimize the contribution of investment, in particular private-sector investment, in trade facilitation, with a particular focus on its impacts on international transport networks and on the efficiency of transport services and their contribution to trade facilitation.

    The meeting will also deal with the use of information and communication technologies in logistics, trade facilitation and supply chain security... (TD/B/55/9, para. 2 (a)).

  • Support to the implementation process of the Almaty Programme of Action, including the analysis of bottlenecks between landlocked and transit developing countries, and possible appropriate solutions to address them, including best practices in the development and use of transport infrastructure, as well as the adoption of common standards, in landlocked and transit developing countries... (TD/B/55/9, para. 2 (f)).
     

When improving trade performance and competitiveness, a holistic approach is needed to combine policy actions and measures targeting the access to cost-effective transport services, the energy efficiency and sustainability of transport systems, the impacts of climate change on transport operations, and trade facilitation reforms and customs automation.

In the framework of the mandate provided in paragraphs 107 and 164-168 of the Accra Accord, the meeting will provide an opportunity to look at the road ahead in terms of challenges and policy options in these fields and to consider the role UNCTAD and partners can play to help developing countries in the envisaged follow-up and implementation of policy actions.


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Review of Maritime Transport 2011
UNCTAD/RMT/2011

More than 80 per cent of international trade in goods is carried by sea, and an even higher percentage of developing-country trade is carried in ships.

The Review of Maritime Transport, an annual publication prepared by the Division on Technology and Logistics of the UNCTAD secretariat, is an important source of information on this vital sector. It closely monitors developments affecting world seaborne trade, freight rates, ports, surface transport and logistics services, as well as trends in ship ownership and control and fleet age, tonnage supply and productivity.

The Review contains a chapter on legal and regulatory developments and each year includes a special chapter analysing a selected topic in depth. In 2011, the focus is on the participation of developing countries in different maritime businesses.

Key developments reported in this year´s Review include the following:

  • After contracting in 2009, international shipping experienced an upswing in demand in 2010, and recorded a positive turnaround in volumes, especially in the dry bulk and container trade segments. Total seaborne trade reached an estimated 8.4 billion tons in 2010.
  • The year 2010 saw record deliveries of new tonnage, 28 per cent higher than in 2009, resulting in an 8.6 per cent growth in the world merchant fleet. The fleet reached almost 1.4 billion deadweight tons (dwt) in January 2011, an increase of 120 million dwt over 2010. New deliveries stood at 150 million dwt, against demolitions and other withdrawals from the market of approximately 30 million dwt.
  • The price of newbuildings was lower for all vessels types in 2010, reflecting market views that in the short term, the capacity of the world fleet is sufficient to meet world trade.
  • World container port throughput increased by an estimated 13.3 per cent to 531 million 20-foot equivalent units, or TEUs, in 2010, after stumbling briefly in 2009. The UNCTAD Liner Shipping Connectivity Index (LSCI) reveals that China maintains its lead as the single most connected country. It is followed by Hong Kong (China), Singapore and Germany. In 2011, 91 countries increased their LSCI ranking over 2010, 6 saw no change, and 65 recorded a decrease.
  • In 2010, the rail freight sector grew by 7.2 per cent to reach 9,843 billion freight ton kilometres (FTKs) The road freight sector grew by 7.8 per cent in 2010 over the previous year, with volumes reaching 9,721 billion FTKs.

Important legal and regulatory developments included the entry into force on 14 September 2011 of the International Convention on Arrest of Ships, which had been adopted at a joint United Nations-International Maritime Organization (IMO) diplomatic conference held in 1999 under the auspices of UNCTAD. Moreover, during 2010 and the first half of 2011, important discussions continued at IMO regarding the scope and content of a possible international regime to control greenhouse gas emissions from international shipping.

Developing countries are expanding their participation in a range of different maritime businesses. They already hold strong positions in ship scrapping, ship registration and the supply of seafarers, and they have growing market shares in more capital-intensive or technologically advanced maritime sectors such as ship construction and shipowning. China and the Republic of Korea between them built 72.4 per cent of world ship capacity (dwt) in 2010, and 9 of the 20 largest countries in shipowning in January 2011 are developing countries.

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Regional Forum on WTO, Trade Facilitation and the Private Sector in Central America
Hotel Barceló, Guatemala City, 17–18 November 2011.

Global trends in international trade logistics, combined with developments in information and communication technologies, have transformed today’s business environment. In response to those trends, since 2004, the members of the World Trade Organization (WTO) have been negotiating trade facilitation within the Doha Development Round.

In these negotiations and in view of the possible resulting commitments, developing countries are analysing their trade facilitation needs and priorities and attach an increasingly high priority to trade facilitation reforms.

The private sector plays a key role in this endeavour:

  • During the negotiation phase, to identify needs and priorities regarding the trading environment and the potential implications of commitments resulting from a multilateral agreement.

  • During the implementation stage, the private sector may also contribute with experience and knowledge, as well as actively participate in the application of numerous specific measures on trade facilitation.

The Forum focused on the private sector’s perspectives regarding perceived administrative and procedural obstacles to international trade, and the role of multilateral rules in overcoming these obstacles.

The Forum also outlined how the private sector actors, governments and development agencies contribute to the implementation of possible future commitments under the WTO.

The Forum brought together representatives of governments and the private sector from the Central American region involved in trade facilitation, Geneva-based country delegates, and representatives of regional organizations.

Co-organized with: UNCTAD, in collaboration with the Centro y Observatorio Nacional de Facilitación de Comercio e Inversión en Latinoamérica (CONAFACIL).

Sponsor / funding: The Government of Spain, through the UNCTAD Trust Fund on Capacity building in developing countries and least developed countries to support their effective participation in the WTO negotiations process on trade facilitation.

Contact: Mr. Jan Hoffmann, UNCTAD Trade Facilitation Section
T.: (+41) 22 917 20 32
F.: (+41) 22 917 00 50
E.: jan.hoffmann@unctad.org


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Regional Forum on WTO, Trade Facilitation and the Private Sector in Latin America
ECLAC, Santiago de Chile, 21 October 2011.

The Forum focused on the private sector’s perspectives regarding perceived administrative and procedural obstacles to international trade, and the role of multilateral rules in overcoming these obstacles.

The Forum also outlined how the private sector actors, governments and development agencies can contribute to the implementation of possible future commitments under the WTO.

The Forum brought together representatives of governments and the private sector from the Latin American Integration Association (ALADI) member countries involved in trade facilitation, Geneva-based country delegates, and representatives of regional and international organizations.

Sponsor / funding: The Government of Spain, through the UNCTAD Trust Fund on Capacity building in developing countries and least developed countries to support their effective participation in the WTO negotiations process on trade facilitation.

Co-organized with: UNCTAD, in collaboration with the Economic Commission for Latin America and the Caribbean (ECLAC).

Contact: Mr. Jan Hoffmann, UNCTAD Trade Facilitation Section
T.: (+41) 22 917 20 32
F.: (+41) 22 917 00 50
E.: jan.hoffmann@unctad.org


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Ad Hoc Expert Meeting on Climate change impacts and adaptation: a challenge for global ports
Geneva, 29-30 September 2011.

The meeting follows and builds on earlier related activities carried out by the UNCTAD secretariat, including in particular the first session of the Multi-year Expert Meeting on Transport and Trade Facilitation, held on 16-18 February 2009 with a focus on "Maritime Transport and the Climate Change Challenge", and a Joint UNECE-UNCTAD Workshop on "Climate Change Impacts on International Transport Networks", held on 8 September 2010.

With over 80 per cent of the volume of world trade carried by sea, international shipping and ports provide crucial linkages in global supply-chains and are essential for the ability of all countries, including those that are landlocked, to access global markets. Ports are likely to be affected directly and indirectly by climatic changes, such as rising sea levels, extreme weather events and rising temperatures, with broader implications for international trade and for the development prospects of the most vulnerable nations, in particular least developed countries (LDCs) and Small Island Developing States (SIDS).

Given their strategic role as part of the globalized trading system, adapting ports in different parts of the world to the impacts of climate change is of considerable importance. A good understanding of risks and vulnerabilities is a pre-condition to well-designed and effective adaptation response measures that enhance the resilience of port systems, structures and processes and minimize the adverse effects of climatic factors.

Against this background and to help advance the important debate on how best to move forward, the ad hoc expert meeting provides a platform for discussion as well as an opportunity to share information, experiences and practices.

The meeting aims to bring together a wide range of interested parties from the public and private sectors, including policy makers and planning authorities, port industry representatives and operators, port users, relevant international organizations, as well as scientists and engineers, to share their insights and discuss relevant issues with a view to identifying:

     * Vulnerabilities and risks

     * Associated adaptation requirements

     * Existing best practices, information and data sources

     * Issues requiring further study, including data requirements

     * Partners and mechanisms for effective collaboration


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On-line repository on national and regional Trade Facilitation Working Groups
Geneva, 2 May 2011.

UNCTAD in collaboration with UNECE continue to maintain the on-line repository on national and regional Trade Facilitation Working Groups. The repository offers case studies from countries that have set up an operation national and/or regional coordinating mechanism on trade facilitation.

The repository will be expanded over time. Countries are invited to share their experiences.

Please contact Jan.Hoffmann@unctad.org

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Technical Notes on Trade Facilitation Measures
 
The Technical Notes on Trade Facilitation Measures were first published in 2006 to provide background information on the concepts discussed in the trade facilitation negotiations at the World Trade Organization (WTO). The WTO negotiations on trade facilitation have evolved over the past three years, with a number of new issues being brought up, and other concepts dropped.

These notes have been revised to reflect the latest developments in these negotiations; they now feature 17 individual technical notes on trade facilitation. Each of the notes introduces technical and practical details of major trade facilitation concepts and best practices as they relate to the consolidated draft text of the WTO negotiations on trade facilitation issued by the Chair of the Negotiating Group on Trade Facilitation in December 2009 (TN/TF/W/165 and its revisions)


 

Ad-Hoc Expert Meeting: Trade Facilitation in Regional Trade Arrangements
Geneva, 30-31 March 2011
Many trade facilitation measures included in RTAs are non-discriminatory against non-RTA trading partners.

On the other hand, RTAs include some trade facilitation measures such as the provision of advanced rulings, the use of regional standards strictly applied only between RTA partner countries, and simplified customs procedures and fees afforded only to RTA members, and may be discriminatory against third parties.

Another potential complication arises when a country or a regional grouping is party to several RTAs that apply similar trade facilitation measures with different scopes.

This might lead to a "spaghetti bowl" of different customs procedures applied for different trading partners in the region.

The objective of the Ad Hoc Expert Meeting is to suggest, what the role of UNCTAD could be in assisting developing countries in ensuring coherence between regional and multilateral trade facilitation commitments.


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Quick Links: | Programme |

Review of Maritime Transport 2010
UNCTAD/RMT/2010

More than 80% of international trade in goods is carried by sea, and an even higher percentage of developing-country trade is carried in ships. The Review of Maritime Transport, an annual publication prepared by the Division on Technology and Logistics - UNCTAD secretariat, is an important source of information on this vital sector. It closely monitors developments affecting world seaborne trade, freight rates, ports, surface transport, and logistics services, as well as trends in ship ownership and control and fleet age, tonnage supply, and productivity. The Review contains a chapter on legal and regulatory developments and each year includes a chapter highlighting a different region. In 2010, the focus is on Asia and the Pacific.

Key developments reported this year´s Review include the following:

  • In 2009, world seaborne trade (goods loaded) decreased by 4.5% to 7.94 billion tons.

  • By the beginning of 2010, the total world merchant fleet had expanded by an impressive 7%, to reach 1.276 billion deadweight tons (dwt).

  • World container port throughput declined by estimated 9.7% to reach 465 million TEUs in 2009, the Review reports.

  • UNCTAD´s Liner Shipping Connectivity Index revealed that the average ranking of Least Developed Countries (LDCs) in 2010 was 111, compared to an average ranking of 78 for other developing countries and 64 for developed countries. The rating indicates that LDCs remain isolated from major or frequent shipping routes. Between 2004 and 2010, the connectivity ranking of LDCs improved just 1 point.

  • The RMT also details recent developments in maritime legislation such as steps by the International Maritime Organization (IMO) regarding the scope and content of an international regime to control greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from international shipping. In April 2010 a protocol on the 1996 Hazardous and Noxious Substances Convention was adopted which aims to overcome obstacles to the ratification and entry into force of the Convention.

  • The chapter on the developments in the Asia-Pacific region reviews the period from 2007 to 2009, and gives special consideration to landlocked developing countries in the region. The Review shows a downturn 4 % in economic activity in 2009, reflecting the wide geographical spread of the global 2008 crisis. The Asia-Pacific region decelerated to its lowest level in 8 years. Container trade volumes on the trans-Pacific and the Asia-Europe trades plummeted in 2009 as did intra-Asian container volumes and the Asia-Pacific port container throughput. By mid-2010, economic indicators were showing a recovery in the region´s economic growth and trade.


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Multi-year expert meeting on transport and trade facilitation (third session) focusing on Emerging Challenges and Recent Developments Affecting Transport and Trade Facilitation.
Geneva, 8-10 December 2010.

Against a background of growing demands on transport and trade brought about by globalisation and with the world economy currently at a critical juncture, the three-day Expert Meeting will provide a forum for discussion and expert policy debate with a view to improving the understanding of various emerging challenges and recent developments affecting transportation and trade facilitation.

Topics are diverse and include: • recent developments in trade facilitation, including the WTO trade facilitation negotiations and relevant regional and national initiatives; • some key issues at the interface of the energy and climate change debate and their implications for transport costs and trade: fossil fuel supplies, the impact of oil prices on transport costs and the costs of climate change adaptation in transportation; • recent developments in the field of environmental regulation and labour standards namely (i) liability for ship-source pollution under the 1996 HNS Convention and the 1992 IOPC Fund Convention regimes, with emphasis on latest developments, (ii) the 2009 Hong Kong International Convention for the safe and environmentally sound recycling of ships, and (iii) the 2006 Maritime Labour Convention; • the use of information and communication technologies (ICT) in logistics, trade facilitation and supply-chain security.

The programme of speakers includes representatives from the Asian Development Bank, West African Economic and Monetary Union (UEMOA), IEA, World Bank, IOPC Fund, IMO, ILO, WCO, CEMAC as well as representatives from national governments and academia.

Relevant documents, including a background note and a provisional agenda are available here. Other information pertaining to the Expert Meeting, including logistical details can also be found by accessing the above weblink.

Participation in the Expert Meeting is open to government nominated experts from all UNCTAD member States, as well as accredited intergovernmental and non-governmental organizations. Individuals who may wish to approach their government with a view to being nominated as Experts are advised to contact the relevant mission to the United Nations in Geneva.

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Transport Newsletter No. 47, 2010
UNCTAD/WEB/DTL/TLB/2010/4

A combination of factors is currently transforming the international transportation landscape, spanning a broad range of areas, including economic, energy-related, environmental, political, regulatory, and technological. These factors have a significant impact on transport and trade costs which greatly determine developing countries’ trade performances and competitiveness. They also entail implications for transport policy objectives such as efficiency, cost-effectiveness, trade facilitation, security as well as environmental, energy and social sustainability. UNCTAD’s next session of the Multi-year Expert Meeting on Transport and Trade Facilitation, to take place in Geneva from 8–10 December 2010, will provide a forum for experts from UNCTAD’s member countries to analyse and discuss these implications.

Two articles in this issue look at liner shipping, notably at trends in liner shipping connectivity and the transport of refrigerated cargo, and we report on a recent meeting on climate change impacts on international transport networks. We further present a recently initiated trade and transport facilitation project in Pakistan, report on a trade facilitation workshop in St. Lucia, and suggest which topics of the Global Facilitation Partnership (GFP) portal cover the issues dealt with in the 15 Articles of the future agreement on trade facilitation which is currently being negotiated at the WTO. Finally, we present new documents and events of interest to policy makers and researchers dealing with transport and trade facilitation.

 


Joint UNECE-UNCTAD Workshop: Climate Change Impacts on International Transport Networks
Geneva, 8 September 2010

The UNECE-UNCTAD Workshop, held, as part of the twenty-third session of the UNECE Working Party on Transport Trends and Economics, is part of a series of UNECE activities focused on climate change and transport, and builds on the expertise and earlier work by UNCTAD on related issues.

It is expected to raise awareness among UNECE and UNCTAD member States, transport industry stakeholders, and intergovernmental/non-governmental organizations about the potentially important challenges climate change impacts and adaptation requirements present for international transportation - a complex set of issues that has so far received little attention.

It is hoped that the Workshop will provide a platform for fruitful and considered discussions and set the pace for future work on how best to bridge the knowledge gaps related to our understanding of climate change impacts on transport networks with a view to identifying adequate adaptation responses. Discussions are expected to cover issues relating to different modes of transportation in international supply-chains, taking into account the situation in both developed and developing countries.

Additional information and documents pertaining to the Workshop will also be posted on the UNECE website.

 

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